Rottweiler
(Rottweil Dog, "Rottie")
© by C. Marien-de Luca for Bulldog Information 2003-2009. All rights reserved.
Photo courtesy: Jelena Jegorova, www.dogs.lt, and Séverine Colmé, La Tour gelée
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Rottweiler in sunglasses and bandana
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An Owner's Guide Raising your Pet Protector
An Owner's Guide to Raising Your Pet Protector
by Lori Berg, Michael ''Gypsy'' Stratten

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The Rottweiler is a medium large, strong-minded and powerful dog  breed originating from Germany.

The breed is of ancient origin, but its true history remain misty to this day. In Germany it was first called the Rottweiler Metzgerhund which translates literally as the 'butcher's dog from Rottweil', because it was used as a butcher's dog in the whole region around Rottweil. For more information about the Rottweiler's origin, see our page about the history of the Rottweiler breed.
Origins of the Rottweiler
Breeding levels
Introduction
The Rottweiler is a short-coated, black-and-tan dog. The body is compact and powerfull, with a broad deep chest and muscular neck, conveying boldness and courage. The coat color is predominantly black with clearly defined tan markings on the cheeks, muzzle, chest, legs, and eyebrows.
Rottweiler head study
The eyes are dark brown and should indicate good humor. The ears are set high and wide and are proportionally small. The tail is usually docked.
The breed standard mentions self-confidence and fearlessness, together with "a self-assured aloofness that does not lend itself to immediate and indiscriminate friendships".
Adult male Rottweiler and female rottweiler pup
Yengol's Bronko
Temperament and Character
Adult male Rottweiler and female puppy
Photo: Brenda A. Smith
Rottweilers are highly trainable and intelligent dogs. In their home country a 'trainability level' or breeding level forms an integral part of the dog's pedigree. Training and proper socialization are a must, but training must always be undertaken professionally to avoid overstimulation of the naturally protective instincts of the Rottweiler. For the same reason and more than with any other breed, prospective owners are encouraged to seek a reliable breeder to avoid getting a potentially ill-bred dog with antecedents of problem behavior in the breeding lines. Signs of anxiety, shyness, or hyperactivity are not characteristic of the breed and specimens displaying these traits should not be bred.
Rottweilers were once used as cattle drivers and what appears to be aggression or dominance in some dogs may possibly be herding behavior.

 
With a high-drive dog like a Rottweiler dominance and drive must be properly channeled to avoid that this turns into aggression (or what could be perceived as aggression), especially in dogs with unstable temperaments.  For all these reasons this is not a dog for a novice owner, and even more experienced dog owners will preferably buy their Rottweiler puppy from an established breeder who takes great care in selecting his breeding lines.
Photo by Kym Parry
The Professional's Book of Rottweilers
(Professional Book of Series) (Hardcover)
by Anna Katherine Nicholas
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The Professional's Book of Rottweilers
The Ultimate Rotweiler
The Ultimate Rottweiler
Second Edition (Hardcover)
by Andrew H. Brace (Editor)
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Rottweilers
Rottweilers:
Everything About Purchase, Care, Nutrition, Breeding, Behavior, and Training
(Complete Pet Owner's Manual)
(Paperback)
by Kerry V. Kern
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